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Resources: Papers & Presentations

Welcome to the Papers & Presentations page, a sampling of the information and resources our GPS Dairy Consulting group is committed to sharing to bring value to our clients and the dairy industry. Many of these resources are national presentations or articles written by members of GPS Dairy Consulting and illustrate our internal and external network of expertise.

 

Take A Bite Out of Feed Refusals

By Kimberlee Schoonmaker | Wednesday, July 09, 2003

It’s hard to change an old habit.

For years, dairy producers have stoically fed cows for a 5-percent — sometimes even higher — feed-refusal rate. It’s a classic example of an old habit that dies hard. After all, that’s the way it’s always been.

Indeed, the concept of feeding cows for a 5-percent feed-refusal rate evolved as a way to solve the “empty bunk problem,” says Jim Barmore, of Five Star Dairy Consulting in Verona, Wis. After all, you don’t want the cows to get hungry between meals, or milk production could suffer. Read more...

Stretching Feed Dollars Always Important

By Ron Johnson Dairy Editor | Thursday, December 18, 2008

What’s the single biggest variable expense a dairy farm faces? It’s feed. Jim Barmore, the owner of Five-Star Dairy Consulting, Verona, talked about “ration management opportunities” at last week’s Tri-State Regional Dairy Summit in Fennimore.

He pointed out that feed costs hold the distinction of being the biggest variable cost under four scenarios. They’re the largest when “milk prices are low and feed costs are high,” and when “feed costs are moderate and milk component prices are low,” Barmore said. The same holds true when “milk prices are high but feed costs are extremely high,” and when “labor costs are high and feed costs are low,” he added.

The good news is that since feed costs are variable, it’s possible to raise them or lower them. But Barmore mentioned two “golden rules” that he said should be heeded when trying to cut feed costs. Read more...

Fine-Tuning The Ration Mixing And Feeding Of High Producing Herds

James A. Barmore, Technical Service Specialist | Monsanto Dairy Business

Feed is the single largest operating expense on dairy farms and should be considered one of the most important variables behind successful production, animal health, and profitability of a dairy. Annual feed costs per milking cow can average $1000 to $1200 per year, or $100,000 to $120,000 for every 100 milking cows. Despite this fact, only a minority of dairy farms closely track feed quality variation, feed mixing, inventories, feed bunk delivery, shrink, and corresponding animal performance. The result is lost opportunity to improve cow performance and to better management expenses. Total mixed rations (TMR) have rapidly grown to be the preferred method of feeding for non-grazing herds. Although TMR caught on many years ago, the art and science of how to best manage specific mixers continues to evolve. The questions have largely moved beyond the advantages of a TMR and are now more focused on “How can my TMR mixing and feeding be improved?” Read more...

CASE STUDY:
Laboratory Evaluation of Corn Grain and Silage Digestibility

M. Tassoul | R. Shaver, PA | J. Barmore, PAS | D. Taysomd | P. Hoffman

The primary objective of this trial was to compare commercially available laboratory assays for assessing starch digestibility
of dry (DC) and high-moisture (HMC) corn and corn silage (WPCS) using samples from 22 dairy farms.
Read more...

Consistency In Feeding Is The Key

By Jim Barmore | Thursday, March 22, 2007

Cow comfort and nutrition are the most important factors which determine the cow’s health and performance. As caretakers of the cows, we have a direct impact on their health and have a responsibility every day to keep fresh, properly mixed Total Mixed Ration (TMR) in front of them at all times. Read more...

Feeding Dairy Cows: In Vitro NDF Digestibility

Randy Shaver | Professor and Extension Dairy Nutritionist

This fact sheet has been developed to support the implementation of the Natural Resources Conservation Service Feed Management 592 Practice Standard. The Feed Management 592 Practice Standard was adopted by NRCS in 2003 as another tool to assist with addressing resource concerns on livestock and poultry operations. Feed management can assist with reducing the import of nutrients to the farm and reduce the excretion of nutrients in manure. Read more...

Transition and Reproduction

By Dr. Dave Prentice

In the past ten years the transition period has received much attention because of its affect on milk production, metabolic disease, and ultimately reproduction. Since milk production is the main driving force of dairy profitability, it's obvious that we need to get cows started correctly in a proper transition period. James Barmore, a technical service specialist with Monsanto Dairy
Business, states "High production and good health largely are a result of minimizing the cow’s exposure to stress." Read more...

Evaluating Corn Silage Quality For Dairy Cattle

Randy Shaver | Professor and Extension Dairy Nutritionist

This fact sheet has been developed to support the implementation of the Natural Resources Conservation Service Feed Management 592 Practice Standard. The Feed Management 592 Practice Standard was adopted by NRCS in 2003 as another tool to assist with addressing resource concerns on livestock and poultry operations. Feed management can assist with reducing the import of nutrients to the farm and reduce the excretion of nutrients in manure. Read more...

 

VIDEO: Abel Dairy Farm Alfalfa & Wayside Dairy
Corn Silage Time Lapse

VIDEO: Seven Oaks Dairy Corn Silage Time Lapse

4-State Nutrition Conference Presentations

2013 Hall Protein CHO 4 State 061213
2013 Hall Protein CHO 4 State 061213
Bill Braman, Christer Ohlsson Effects of SiloSolve inoculants on silage quality, dairy performance and production efficiency
Bill Braman, Christer Ohlsson Effects of SiloSolve inoculants on silage quality, dairy performance and production efficiency
Bill Braman Intro Improving Feed Efficiency in Dairy Cattle
Bill Braman Intro Improving Feed Efficiency in Dairy Cattle
Bill Braman Welcome Improving Feed Efficiency In Dairy Cattle
Bill Braman Welcome Improving Feed Efficiency In Dairy Cattle
Keith Sather
Keith Sather
Marty Faldet, 4-State 2013
Marty Faldet
4-State 2013
Four State 2013 Feed Efficiency
Four State 2013 Feed Efficiency

White Papers Downloads

Key Performance Monitoring Of Dairies
Key Performance Monitoring Of Dairies

Improving The Bottom-line – More Cows or Less Crowding
Improving The Bottom-line – More Cows or Less Crowding
Monitoring And Managing Feeding, Inventory, And Shrink
Monitoring And Managing Feeding, Inventory, And Shrink
What Herd Records Can And Can't Tell Us
What Herd Records Can And Can't Tell Us
Know The Numbers That Really Count
Know The Numbers That Really Count
Wasted Feed Means Wasted Dollars
Wasted Feed Means Wasted Dollars
Review The Basics Of Transition Cow Care
Review The Basics Of Transition Cow Care
AgriView IOFC Sept 2008
AgriView IOFC Sept 2008

Natural vs
Synthetic 
Vitamin E

Natural vs
Synthetic
Vitamin E

Protect Dairy Herd’s Health &
Profitability with ADM Nova-E™
Natural-Source Vitamin E

Protect Dairy Herd’s Health &
Profitability with ADM Nova-E™
Natural-Source Vitamin E

Controlling
Input 
Costs

Controlling
Input
Costs

Controlling
Input 
Costs

Maximizing
Close-Up DMI.pdf
 
     

Performance Monitoring of Dairy Nutrition and Feeding

Jim Barmore and Greg Bethard | Five-Star Dairy Consulting, LLC and G & R Dairy Consulting, Inc

Feed is the single largest operating expense on dairy farms, while feeding and nutrition should be considered one of the most important variables behind successful production, animal health and profitability of a dairy. Annual feed costs per milking cow can average $1000 to $1200 per year, or $100,000 to $120,000 for every 100 milking cows. Despite this fact, only a minority of dairy farms closely monitor feed quality variation, feed mixing, inventories, feed bunk delivery, shrink, feed costs, and corresponding animal performance. The result is lost opportunity to improve cow performance and to better management expenses. Read more...

Give Her Room To Drink

By Shirley Roenfeldt | Monday, May 01, 2000

When Mike Larson noticed boss cows staking out their territory around waterers, he suspected the other 800 cows at his dairy were not getting enough to drink, despite providing the recommended water space per cow. So, the Evansville, Wis., producer, who along with his family own Larson Acres Inc., conducted an experiment. During an expansion project, they installed a temporary 40-foot water tank on one side of a 14-foot wide breezeway where the cows returned to the free-stall barn. Read more...

 

 

   
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